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Drama Warm-ups

“Aw…,” “Ha Ha!”, and “Ah-Ha!”: Finding Flow in Drama Warm-ups

On September 23rd, Teresa Love, one of our drama education experts serving on the BYU ARTS Partnership leadership team, worked with elementary school teachers in the Arts Integration endorsement program on the creation of drama lesson plans. What Teresa shares is always golden, pithy, and organized. At the onset of their discussion (their? I was there, so let’s try that again). At the onset of our discussion, she emphasized the importance of selecting strategic warm-ups for drama lessons.  She stated the importance of drama warm-ups by naming the actor’s tools—voice, body, and mind—and asked teachers to reflect on which tools…

Life is Better With the Arts

The arts impact the lives of students, educators, and communities. This idea reflects the founding principle of the Arts for Life initiative. Created by the Utah Partnership for Arts Education, Arts for Life shares stories of how the arts personally affect people. By highlighting these personal stories, the Arts for Life initiative reveals the rich and strong significance of arts education in helping people deal with life’s struggles, giving them hope, and providing a creative outlet. Rhonda Rhodes, a past president of UMEA, explained that creating resources for principals was the original idea uniting the four founding organizations of Arts…

Truth Telling

Image: Navajo Woman Weaving, Navajo Reservation, Arizona 1985. Sue Bennett, Photographer I walked into my living room a while back and saw my nephew’s sons (whom I call grandsons and they call me grandma) using my late mother’s Navajo spindle and batten as swords, chasing and chasing each other around the room. I stopped them both and said, “These were your Grandma Daisy’s weaving tools, and now they are mine to take care of. They are not swords but are tools for weaving rugs.” I brought out several rugs that their great-grandmother had woven and showed them how the tools…

Including the Arts in Classroom Rituals

Rituals are an important part of building a physically and emotionally safe classroom environment. Arts activities can be used as rituals to help students and teachers feel connected as a classroom community. Rituals are used to greet students, say goodbye, honor student work, establish procedures, organize materials, and transition between activities and the arts can help. For example, meditation with music serves to invite focus and calm, a tableaux engages interest, and a braindance can release physical energy.  Rituals create emotional continuity. A rhythmic call-and-response game between the teacher and class members can help students regulate their internal chronometer and…

Ariel Hortin demonstrates the Martha Graham contraction.

Therapeutic Dance and Dance Movement Therapy

Dance as therapy and dance in therapy: Ariel Hortin explains the unique benefits of dance movement therapy as a tool for improving self-awareness, developing the mind-body connection, and giving voice to feelings and experiences that aren’t easily articulated.

Full Body Feelings: A Movement Activity to Support Emotional Intelligence In a Masked Classroom

The BYU ARTS Partnership promotes the physical, cognitive, social, and emotional benefits of the arts to impact student learning, well-being, and relationships in the classroom. We honor the work of certified/licensed arts therapists and do not promote that educators act as therapists. The following article was written by Ariel Hortin, a dance educator and mom of three from Vineyard, Utah. She is currently studying to become a Movement/Dance Therapist and Clinical Mental Health Counselor at Lesley University and is an adjunct professor in the BYU Dance Department. Ariel strives to be a catalyst for joy and facilitator for change through…

Honoring September 11 Through Art

Today marks the anniversary of the September 11, 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center in New York City. This post spotlights a variety of art works spanning different art disciplines, describing the unique ways the arts helped communities across the country unite, connect, and rejuvenate in the face of unprecedented events. Channeling the pain, grief, and shock from that day onto canvas and into body art, envelopes, tree preservation, film, and movement reflects the urgency of art-making in response to crisis. These works provide tangible evidence of how communities across the nation turned their collective energy to the healing…

More…POPS opportunities abound for the classroom as well as remote learning

Now that school has begun, many opportunities exist for integrating the arts into teaching and learning. Professional Outreach Programs in the Schools (POPS) provide resources that can be used in the classroom as well as remotely.  POPS is managed by the Utah State Board of Education and sponsored by the Utah State Legislature. The program brings arts education and professional artists across multiple disciplines to educators and schools for free or subsidized costs. Many of the experiences are also readily accessed online.  Springville Museum of Art The Springville Museum of Art’s Museum from Home page offers several resources for teachers…

Using Visual Art to Express What Can’t be Spoken

“The singular focus of drawing and meditating, in the quiet of my home, cultivated a connection with something intuitive and creative that surpassed the physical realm of bodily sensations.” –Lisa KatharinaTrauma and its ripple effects affect everyone, teachers and students alike. Dr. Francine Shapiro is a pioneering therapist who defines trauma as “any event that has a lasting negative effect on the self.” Though our experiences differ, often the feelings and “lasting negative effects” housed in the body are similar. Often, the impact of traumatic events are felt so deeply that the experience is entirely beyond words.  Engaging in visual…

Mindfulness through Music

Throughout the recent months of uncertainty and change, children and adults alike are experiencing a wide range of emotions. Some of these emotions may be causing stress, anxiety, or even depression. Trying the following mindfulness activities will focus your attention, help you become aware of your thoughts and feelings, and create a healthy space for big emotions. These activities are designed for adults, and children can join in, too! Activity 1: Focus Your Attention Find a comfortable place to sit, or stretch out on the floor. Click on one of the links below or choose a song from this Spotify…

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