Drama

Drama Warm-ups

“Aw…,” “Ha Ha!”, and “Ah-Ha!”: Finding Flow in Drama Warm-ups

On September 23rd, Teresa Love, one of our drama education experts serving on the BYU ARTS Partnership leadership team, worked with elementary school teachers in the Arts Integration endorsement program on the creation of drama lesson plans. What Teresa shares is always golden, pithy, and organized. At the onset of their discussion (their? I was there, so let’s try that again). At the onset of our discussion, she emphasized the importance of selecting strategic warm-ups for drama lessons.  She stated the importance of drama warm-ups by naming the actor’s tools—voice, body, and mind—and asked teachers to reflect on which tools…

Including the Arts in Classroom Rituals

Rituals are an important part of building a physically and emotionally safe classroom environment. Arts activities can be used as rituals to help students and teachers feel connected as a classroom community. Rituals are used to greet students, say goodbye, honor student work, establish procedures, organize materials, and transition between activities and the arts can help. For example, meditation with music serves to invite focus and calm, a tableaux engages interest, and a braindance can release physical energy.  Rituals create emotional continuity. A rhythmic call-and-response game between the teacher and class members can help students regulate their internal chronometer and…

Full Body Feelings: A Movement Activity to Support Emotional Intelligence In a Masked Classroom

The BYU ARTS Partnership promotes the physical, cognitive, social, and emotional benefits of the arts to impact student learning, well-being, and relationships in the classroom. We honor the work of certified/licensed arts therapists and do not promote that educators act as therapists. The following article was written by Ariel Hortin, a dance educator and mom of three from Vineyard, Utah. She is currently studying to become a Movement/Dance Therapist and Clinical Mental Health Counselor at Lesley University and is an adjunct professor in the BYU Dance Department. Ariel strives to be a catalyst for joy and facilitator for change through…

Utah’s Professional Arts Education Organization’s Support Arts Educators as They Return to School

Representing each art form, the presidents of the various Utah arts professional organizations created the Utah Arts Education Coalition. Since June 5th, these coalition members have been meeting weekly with Cathy Jensen and other state arts leaders to discuss the impact of Covid-19 on arts education in Utah. The purpose of these meetings is to share up-to-date information and decisions faced by the Utah State Board of Education, Utah legislators, and other state leaders so that the various professional arts organizations and their membership can coordinate efforts to advocate proactively DURING decision-making processes.   The Utah Arts Education Coalition is comprised…

POPS: Resources for Professional Development and Remote Learning in the Arts

Recently, the quick shift to remote learning presented a unique challenge to many educators. Though school may be out for the summer, we know teachers are continuing to work hard, preparing for the unknowns of next year through summer team collaborations, individual development, or lesson planning. POPS (Professional Outreach Program in the Schools) has resources to help prepare for the upcoming school year. There are also great resources available to share with your students during the summer months.  POPS is a resource managed by the Utah State Board of Education and sponsored by the Utah State Legislature. POPS is designed…

Non-tech Arts Activities at Home: Drama

Drama encourages playing with others. Even when the audience is only those with whom you are sheltering in place, using drama in ordinary moments will refresh, rejuvenate and remind children that daily living can be filled with wonderment and joy. The drama activities listed below provide much needed centering, and will help family groups deepen relationships. The following are easy, non-tech ideas and only require materials already around the house. READ ALOUD TO ONE ANOTHER Use character voices. (Gandalf is distinct from Bilbo, right?)  Build tension by speaking faster or slower. (Remember when Hermione is trapped in the ladies room…

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